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More important, however, participants preferred people whose online persona could be clearly traced to a real person.“Instead of just saying, ‘I write a blog,’ name the blog and encourage people to check it out,” High says. High and Wotipka presented their preliminary findings in November 2014 at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association.They plan to submit a paper to a peer-reviewed journal in the spring of 2015.The researchers found that a variety of factors, from age to camera quality, affected users’ decisions to reach out to others.

studies done on online dating-18

Put yourself on Tinder, and you might end up with a date—or a crippling case of negative thoughts about yourself.

So suggests a new study about the psychological effects of the popular dating app, presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

How you fill out an online profile makes a big difference in how you're seen by others.

New research shows it is better to be real with your information than trying to be perfect. In fact, researchers at the University of Iowa say people who are looking for love online are less apt to trust a person with a flashy profile, preferring instead a potential partner who appears not only successful, but humble and real as well. “It’s tough when it comes to dating profiles because we want someone who seems like an amazing person, but we also hopefully will have a relationship with this individual, so we want them to exist.”As many as one in 10 Americans age 18 and older use online dating sites or a mobile dating app—according to a 2013 study by the Pew Research Center.

In the study, researchers asked a group of 1,300 mostly college kids to rate how they generally felt about themselves through questionnaires and self-reports.

Questions like Compared to people who weren’t on the dating app, Tinder users had lower levels of self-worth, reported being less satisfied with their faces and looks and were more ashamed of their bodies.

High and Crystal Wotipka, lead author of the study and graduate teaching assistant in the UI’s Department of Communication Studies, wanted to know how people who use these sites respond to different ways people present themselves online.

What they discovered is most people in their study were drawn to individuals whose profiles were positive but not over-the-top glowing. If you can name something or provide people with a link to get there, then do it.

Dating sites are now steering you toward people who have similar tastes in movies, music, religion and education, " Bartz said.

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